Copper Cookware

There is a ton of science that goes into making pure, healthy, and original American-made copper cookware. But to keep from getting too particular about electrons, crystal structure and coefficients of thermal expansion, we’ll lay down the basics of what goes into making copper pots for your kitchen.

We start with sheets of pure copper, which, for you metalheads out there, is a phosphorous deoxidized grade (so it tins best) that is then cut using water pressure into discs by our awesome fabricators at Ohio Metal (because we don’t have money for a huge CNC machine in our garage!).

The discs are then placed on CNC machines, where they are hand-operated to spin to the House Copper specifics we designed. Copper hardens/anneals as it is drawn up, so the operator has to have a feel for the metal, and know if it’s going to be drawn too quickly and the pot would collapse, or if the machine is spinning too slowly, and the copper hardens too soon and cracks as it finishes.

Once the copper body components are done, we use our handy rivet gun and cold forged copper rivets, sourced from Wisconsin, to attach the iron handles (for a process on how the handles are made, you can revisit the cast iron process as it’s the same except we use ductile iron for the copper!). From there, we hand wipe the insides of the pot with tin, clean them up, and send them to you!

The final product? Copper cookware, at its most basic, simple, and beautiful.